The Hidden Secret of Edamame.

Wondering about the edamame you’ve had at Japanese restaurants? If you like edamame or are wondering what is edamame, here’s what you need to know.

What is Edamame?

Edamame | OrganicIsBeautiful
Edamame | OrganicIsBeautiful

Plus, edamame is naturally gluten-free and low calorie, contains no cholesterol and is an excellent source of protein, iron, and calcium. It is an especially important source of protein for those who follow a plant-based diet.

The beans are particularly popular in the East-Asian cuisine, especially in Japan, Korea, and China. These garden pea like bean pods quietly gaining popularity inside the USA as well as in some European counties recently.

TIPS: Vegetarian lover? Stop right now, edamame is for you! 100 g beans carry 110 calories and provide 10.25 g or 18% of daily recommended intake of protein.

 ∴ Some Awesome Health Benefits

Edamame, just like soybean, is rich in carbohydrates, vitamins, proteins, and minerals.Did you say minerals? Yes, 100 g of fesh bens hold 26% DRI (daily recommended intake) of iron, 56% of magnesium, 36% of copper and 73% of manganese. Manganese used by the body as a co-factor for the powerful anti-oxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.

 OrganicFact shares with us a summary of the key health benefits of consuming Edamame.

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How to cook Edamame at Home

TheKitchn lists 5 different and very simple way to master the Edamame cuisine. I personally eat it raw here in Kuala Lumpur, usually in Japanese restaurant. Written this article, I am curious to know how Malaysian – beside the famous local samba and rice –  incorporates Edamame in their own cooking tradition.

  • Straight up, with salt – Did you know that edamame isn’t just a sushi restaurant appetizer? It’s easily made at home, too. We like to buy bags of frozen, steamed edamame in their pods and just warm it up. Peel and eat!
  • With rice – Edamame beans, shelled from their pods, make a quick and delicious supper. Rice is absolutely everywhere in Asia, some of my workmates eat it for breakfast! Back in 2012, when I was intern in China, I even discovered the black rice (delicious btw).

    Rice | OrganicIsBeautiful
    Rice | OrganicIsBeautiful
  • Stir-fried – You can do many things with those tender little green beans, once they’ve been slit out of their pods, and stir-frying is another great option. Throw into some leftover rice with an egg and quickly stir-fry until hot.
  • In a bean salad – Edamame is also great in tossed bean salads, like this Three Bean Salad with cumin, garlic, lime juice, and black-eyed peas.
  • Pureed in a dip – Here’s a great way to make a party dip that’s healthy but still full of lively and bright flavors: puree edamame beans with lemon, mint, and cheese into a great snack dip.

Do you have other ways you love to eat edamame? Share them here! Here, too, are a few more great posts on recipes:

Vegetarian Lunch: Black Rice Salad with Avocado and Grapefruit

Back to the Basic – A killer Egg Salad Sandwich

Salt & Pepper + Sambal

Amanda 😉

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9 thoughts on “The Hidden Secret of Edamame.”

  1. Pingback: Tumeric Latte – Exploring The World | Going Skin Organic

  2. It is not my favorite thing but if someone has thrown some in a salad I will eat it. 🙂 I know…I should pay greater attention to such a super food. Thanks for sharing.

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